Nothing is better than abiding in an Andaman paradise made up with
a variety of picturesque sceneries from more than hundred islands, in which
white sandy beaches stretch welcoming all the tourists to enjoy sea breeze
and sunshine like Maya Beach, once captured in a Hollywood film, mangrove
forests still untouched by the civilization to waterfalls, natural wonder
not to be missed. Krabi, is a one-stop place for all this is, therefore,
it is absolutely a perfect place for those who yearn for a short stay but
long memory to be remembered.
Tubkaak Beach

Without leaving the mainland, you can find one of
the most tranquil Krabi beaches at Tubkaak. A 20-minute
drive from Ao Nang and just north of Klong Muang,
this sandy beach looks out toward Ko Hong and other
islands rising up from the Andaman Sea.

This is the place to go for some seclusion from the
hustle of more developed areas as only a few hotels
occupy this stretch of coastline. Rich natural forest
backs up the coastline. You can find luxury boutique
hotels here with beach access for a most private and
relaxing stay.

visitting-route_01
visitting-route_02
Klong Muang Beach
As Krabi brings in more and more tourists, it becomes
nearly impossible to have a beach to yourself. Klong
Muang, however, still remains far from the madding
crowd. Located farther up the coast from Ao Nang,
this stretch of clean, light sand lacks the development
that would bring more beachgoers. A major point
separates it from the towns farther south. A visit
here is peaceful and idyllic, more for the contempla-
tive than the adventure seeker. Dine on local seafood,
stay in a beach bungalow or one of the few fi ne
resorts, and enjoy an unspoiled day at the beach.
Nopparat Thara Beach
Causarina trees bring some shade
along the edges of this beach which
stretches almost 3 kilometers just
west of Ao Nang. Thai picnickers
come to lounge on the beach or
wade in the water just offshore.
Walk along the beach of coarse
sand and broken seashells, and at
low tide, wade out to some nearby
rocky islands. The beach is part
of Nopparat Thara - Ko Phi Phi
National Park. Locals may refer to
it as Hat Khlong Haeng or Dried
Canal Beach because the channel
empties at low tide and the beach
becomes long and wide.
visitting-route_04
Ao Nang Beach
visiting-route_05
visiting-route_06 Ao Nang Beach sits right at the edge of the town with the same name
and looks out into the Andaman Sea. Limestone cliffs border the beach
to the east making for some dramatic scenery, and Nopparat Thara
Beach is a short stroll along the main road to the west. The beach has
a wide stretch of packed wet sand at the water’s edge making it good
for a stroll and the sea is shallow here. This is also the starting point for
island boat tours and the connection to Rai Le so expect to see many
boats anchored offshore or run up into the sand. The sunset is magical
with silhouettes of long-tail boats and nearby islands, and the beach has
easy access, just steps from the shops, bars and restaurants along
Ao Nang’s main drag.
Phra Nang Beach
visiting-route_07
Also the location of Phra Nang Cave, this beach
is the most popular on the Phra Nang peninsula
which is home of the popular climbing and
backpacking enclave of Rai Le. The only
lodgings and facilities here are at the luxurious
Rayavadee Resort. Daytrippers can arrive either
from Rai Le or by taking a long-tail boat from
Ao Nang. Travelers come to snorkel, lie on
the beach or visit the famous fertility shrine
located in a cave beneath the limestone cliff.
A small island just offshore can be reached
by wading at low tide and offers a bit of coral
reef. In the afternoon, food vendors arrive in
long-tail boats to serve the beach crowd some
lunch.
visiting-route_08
Ao Rai Ley
visiting-route_09
Pick a side: Rai Le East or Rai Le West? A narrow strip of land unites the wall of limestone karst columns on
the mainland with those of a point jutting into the Andaman Sea. Coming in from Ao Nang, long-tail boats
maneuver through the rocks on the west side to drop off visitors on the wide sandy beach. To the east
is another beach with the sea right up to the narrow crescent strip of sand during high tide and out past mud
flats at low tide. Boats bring in travelers here as well from Krabi Town and Ao Nam Mao. Many come to lie in
the sun in between rock climbing on the surrounding cliffs and partying at night.
visiting-route_10
Maya Beach
visiting-route_14
Pick a side: Rai Le East or Rai Le West? A narrow strip of land unites the wall of limestone karst columns on
the mainland with those of a point jutting into the Andaman Sea. Coming in from Ao Nang, long-tail boats
maneuver through the rocks on the west side to drop off visitors on the wide sandy beach. To the east
is another beach with the sea right up to the narrow crescent strip of sand during high tide and out past mud
flats at low tide. Boats bring in travelers here as well from Krabi Town and Ao Nam Mao. Many come to lie in
the sun in between rock climbing on the surrounding cliffs and partying at night.
Ao Nam Mao
Most people might not even know this beach is here.
The small stretch of golden sand becomes a rocky shore-
line when the tide is out so it is not particularly good for
swimming. A few small resorts and bungalows are nearby
and though the bay is close to Krabi, it has a certain
isolated quality to it. Nearby is Gastropod Fossil Beach.
visiting-route_12
visiting-route_13
Koh Poda
Often part of a long-tail boat tour out of Ao Nang,
Ko Poda is a perfect little stop for a beautiful beach.
The island isn’t even 700 meters across, yet it is sur-
rounded by a lush, green interior coastline of soft, white
sand. Daytrippers swim here or lie in the sun, but
snorkelers will be more interested in the reef which lies
just 20 meters out. There is also a small resort with
a restaurant on the island if you are interested in
spending a bit more time than a boat tour would allow.
visiting-route_15
Ko Kai and Ko Tub
visiting-route_16 Rocky on one side and with a small beach on the
other, the island was dubbed Chicken Island for
a rock formation that resembles the head and neck
of the bird. But Ko Kai is also known for its unusual
low-tide beach. When the water level drops
a narrow spit of sand emerges to connect
the island with another, Ko Tub. This beach
is known as one of the Unseen Thailand
destinations and makes for an impressive photo.
Swimming and snorkeling are nice just off shore.
visiting-route_17
Koh Hong
Hong Island is the star of the Five Islands
Tour. The island offers a beautiful swimming
area, a bay a bit smaller than Maya
Bay in Phi Phi Le Island. You can walk into
the forest a bit here or snorkel along the
rocky ledges of the bay. The sand makes a
half moon beach around a swimming area
away from the boats. At high tide boats
can enter a hidden lagoon in the center
of the island. Low tide means you need a
kayak. Either way, it is a sight you won’t
easily forget.
Phi Phi Don
This is the largest of the Phi Phi Islands
and the only one with permanent residents.
Boat connections to the islands
from the mainland arrive here. In the
center of the island is Tonsai Village,
the main town set on a narrow strip
of land with beaches and Ton Sai and
Loh Dalum Bays on either side or most
of the resorts. However, there are also
a few places to stay scattered around
the island as well, and associated with
smaller, isolated beaches. Most of the
island is green-covered and mountainous
and getting around beyond Tonsai
Village is done only by water taxi. The
atmosphere is laid back and bohemian
but don’t let that convince you this is a
sleepy place. Nightlife includes a number
of bars pumping out music and
even the occasional muay Thai (Thai
boxing) match. Dive shops are numerous
giving you a pretty good idea that
the underwater activity is a big draw.
visiting-route_19
Mai Pai Islands
visiting-route_20 Ko Mai Pai and Ko Yung are sister islands located just north of Phi Phi
Don Island. What makes them so special is their sense of isolation.
Completely uninhabited and surrounded by smooth, flawless sand
beaches, Mai Pai gives visitors a sense of being stranded on the pro-
verbial desert island. The only structure there is an old national park
office. Ko Yung on the other hand is smaller and rocky. The waters
around these islands teem with sea life, and the snorkeling and diving
are impressive. Expect lovely coral gardens, abundant colorful reef fish,
and even the occasional leopard shark. Travelers can reach the islands
in about 30 minutes by long-tail boat from Phi Phi Don Island.
Than Bok Khorani National Park
Once a land of elephants, this 104-
square-kilometer park now harbors a
variety of smaller animals such as otters,
gibbons, flying lemur and mouse
deer, as well as a numerous species
of birds and reptiles. Also part of its
domain is 23 islands in the Andaman
Sea including Hong Island. Riddled
with underground streams and caves
and showing limestone rock towers,
the park is primarily located in a valley.
Plant coverage ranges from rainforest
and freshwater swamp forest to mangrove
forest. Attractions include a waterfall
of the same name, Morakot Pond
and some prehistoric cave paintings.
But don’t miss a tour to the islands for
snorkeling, diving or kayaking.
Ao Tha Lane
This small fishing village up the coast from
Ao Nang is protected from the Andaman
Sea by a series of limestone mountains
standing just offshore. The rocks found
here are some 300 million years old.
Insert Period Channels of sea water
create a network of water trails among
the rocky spires perfect for exploring by
kayak. Langurs and long-tail macaques
occupy these hills and come down with
curiosity to see who has entered their
realm. Some may even swim out to
kayakers and climb aboard for the ride.
Kingfishers hunt the waters and crabs
and mudskippers line the shores. Paddling
among these towers is an incredible
experience for nature lovers, and is a bit
off the beaten tourist path.
Phi Phi Le
visiting-route_22 The smaller of the two main islands
of Phi Phi, this one is uninhabited –
at least by night. During the day
boatloads of daytrippers tour along
its scenic limestone cliffs and sail
into Maya Bay for some snorkeling
and beach time. It’s defi nitely
a paradise and as such is popular
with tourists. The movie
The Beach was filmed here as the
sheer cliffs and curve of sand
create a small scene of hidden
paradise. Boats coming around
Phi Phi Le will also pass by the en-
trance of Viking Cave, a massive
cavern filled with the nests of
swifts, the central ingredient in
bird’s nest soup and a variety of
health drinks. Workers risk their
lives to climb up to retrieve saliva-
made nests the dangers, as well as
the high value of the product,
prohibit tourists from entering.
Pi Le Bay
Another of Phi Phi Le Island’s stunning sights, Pi Le is a long narrow cove on the east side of the island. Lime-
stone cliffs rise straight up over 100 meters from the aquamarine waters. Reachable only by boat, the cove
attracts tours each day but is best visited at high tide. Early in the morning the waters are shaded a bit by
the towering stone. The best snorkeling is at the mouth of the bay.
visiting-route_23
Gastropod Beach
This isn’t your typical beach with sand
and umbrellas in the sun. Rather this
is a beach well past its prime, with its
history frozen in rock. Susaan Hoi, or
Fossil Shell Beach as it is also known,
was a freshwater swamp over 40
million years ago. Over time it became
dry land and eons of change
have produced a shelf-like limestone
rocky surface. These plates lie along
the seaside now and contain many
gastropod fossils ranging from 1 to 5
centimeters in diameter.
Viking Cave
visiting-route_24
The smaller of the two main islands of Phi Phi, this one is uninhabited at least by night. During the day boat-
loads of daytrippers tour along its scenic limestone cliffs and sail into Maya Bay for some snorkeling and beach
time. It’s defi nitely a paradise and as such is popular with tourists. The movie The Beach was filmed here as
the sheer cliffs and curve of sand create bird’s nest soup and a variety of health drinks. Workers risk their lives
to climb up to retrieve saliva-made nests and the dangers, as well as the high value of the product, prohibit
tourists from entering.
Emerald Pond
visiting-route_25
visiting-route_26 Call it what you will - Emerald
Pool, Crystal Lagoon,Sra Morakot
– but the beauty remains
the same. This freshwater pool
lies inside Than Bok Khorani
National Park. The waters of
this 120-square-meter pond
take on a green hue thanks to
an abundance of minerals from
the surrounding limestone hills.
Travelers can slip in for a swim
to escape the heat of the day.
A stream, one of the sources
of the pool, tumbles in at one
end over rock made smooth by
mineral deposits. There is a fee
to enter the park but locals often
don’t need to pay it. The sight of
this glowing water in the midst
of lush green rainforest is not to
be missed.
Koh Lanta
The twin islands of Ko Lanta Yai (Big Lanta) and
Ko Lanta Noi (Small Lanta) are a lovely, less commercial
alternative to the Phi Phi Islands. Only
Lanta Yai has tourist facilities and part of the
island is Ko Lanta National Park. Elephant treks to
the top of the hill there can be arranged. Resorts
occupy the west coast where the beaches are,
and though the islands are not themselves dive
destinations, some of the best sites in all of Thailand
-- Hin Daeng and Hin Muang, for example
are best reached from here by dive boat. This
is the best area to see whale sharks. The snorkeling
is also excellent. Go fishing by long-tail boat,
kayak among the mangroves or even take a Thai
cooking course while you relax on these islands
less traveled.

visiting-route_27
visiting-route_28
Mangrove Forest Lanta
One of the eco tourism that will bring you
to learn more about the existent nature is to
explore the mangrove forest. Find out the

place where the marine lives have begun
before starting their lives in the real large
sea by promenading along the wooden
pathway. Mangrove trees are tall at the
same height with average about 5 meters.

Plants can be found are Avicennia alba,
Rhizophora apiculata, Rhizophora mucronata.
Here is where the ozone freshens up
your mind.
Saladan Village
Really much more of a village than
a town, the small Saladan situated
on the northeast of Lanta Yai is
the place where nearly all the
visitors will firstly set foot on the
Island. There is not much in town
but you can find almost everything
you need at convenient stores,
clothing shops, dive shops and
optical shops. For diving lovers,
the dive boats dock and depart
from here so it is very convenient
to stay very close to them. Budget
to mid-price hotels are available as
well as a diverse restaurants range
from pizza, burger, Indian food and,

of course, Thai food.
Tha Pom Klong Song Nam
visiting-route_32 Nature lovers will appreciate the beauty
of this unusual meeting of the waters
Its name means “two waters canal”
and it is the passage of fresh spring
water through a shaded swamp forest.
The natural park showcases the special
plant life, including mangrove forest,
which thrives where the river meets
the sea. Depending on the tide, the
alternating fresh and brackish waters
rise and fall among the tangled tree
roots. Follow a nice boardwalk through
the park and learn about the environ-
ment from educational signage. Or
take a dip in the bright emerald
waters – but only in the seawater
sections as designated. Low tide is the
best time to come to see the clearest
waters. You can also rent a canoe to
explore the river near the sea.
Namtok Ron Khlong Thom
This is a natural wonder not to be missed on a trip to Krabi. Out in the forest about 40 kilometers south of
Krabi Town is Klong Thom Waterfall. Though the falls itself is just a cascade tumbling gently but a few meters,
it is unique in that the spring water that feeds it bubbles up from the earth at temperature of more than 50
degrees. It cools a bit as it fl ows to the cascade and you can swim in the calm stream below for a much cooler
bath. A boardwalk leads through the forest and there are facilities here for changing. Admission is charged
at the front gate where you can also find a variety of food vendors.
visiting-route_33